How immigrants are redefining 'American' in Southern California

In immigration news: California's Vietnamese immigrants, Peña Nieto talks reform, Emmys 'diversity' flap, more

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Businesses in Westminster, Calif., in a part of Orange County known as Little Saigon. According to a new report, 40 percent of the nearly 1.3 million Vietnamese immigrants in the United States live in California, concentrated in Orange, Los Angeles and Santa Clara counties.

40 percent of nation's Vietnamese immigrants call California home - Southern California Public Radio According to a new report, 40 percent of the nearly 1.3 million Vietnamese immigrants in the United States reside in California. They are concentrated in Orange, Los Angeles and Santa Clara counties; the population in those three counties alone makes up about a quarter of the total U.S. Vietnamese immigrant population.

Mexican President Calls for Immigration Reform - ABC News During a two-day visit to California, Mexican president Enrique Peña Nieto talked of a need for the U.S. to reform its immigration system: "We want to be a factor of cohesion, not division, with full respect for the sovereignty of the United States," President Enrique Peña Nieto said Monday. "This, at the end, is about — and only about — a matter of justice for those who contribute so much to the development of the American society."

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40 percent of nation's Vietnamese immigrants call California home

Top Metropolitan Area Destinations for Vietnamese Immigrants in the United States, 2008-12

MPI tabulation of data from U.S. Census Bureau pooled 2008-12 ACS.

Top Metropolitan Area Destinations for Vietnamese Immigrants in the United States, 2008-12

Forty percent of the country's nearly 1.3 million Vietnamese immigrants reside in California, concentrated in Orange, Los Angeles and Santa Clara counties, according to a report published Monday by the non-partisan Migration Policy Institute.

The immigrants in those three counties alone make up about a quarter of the Vietnamese population for the entire country.

"That geographic concentration is really fascinating," said Jeanne Batalova, a senior policy analyst at the institute. 

Batalova said immigrants' high numbers in California are largely due to secondary migration. When Vietnamese started to arriving in the U.S. in large numbers in the mid-1970s after the end of the Vietnam War, refugee resettlement agencies placed them across the United States.

But, "with time, as social networks and family connections formed in the community, a lot of Vietnamese refugees migrated to a few parts within the United States," Batalova said.

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In immigration news: Executive action hopes, lawsuit over expedited deportations, migrant youth shelters, more

US-POLITICS-IMMIGRATION REFORM

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Now that President Obama has returned from vacation, advocates are hoping he'll soon take executive action on immigration, including a reprieve from deportation for more immigrants.

As Obama returns, advocates look for executive action - The Hill Now that President Obama has returned from vacation, advocates are hoping he'll soon move forward on immigration. The president has stated that he'll take executive action on immigration in the near future, a move some hope will spare more immigrants from deportation and make it easier for businesses to hire foreign workers.

Civil rights groups sue to bar expedited deportations of Central American families - Washington Post Civil rights groups have filed suit asking a federal court to stop the expedited deportations of families and children held at a detention center in Artesia, New Mexico. The complaint alleges that "the Department of Homeland Security has denied due process rights to the families as it seeks to deport the hundreds of undocumented immigrants being housed there."

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Bound by freeways, Chinatown pedestrians face heightened danger

Chinatown traffic

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Grace Yin said that she is extremely cautious crossing Chinatown streets. A relative of hers was hit by a car by Cesar Chavez Avenue and Broadway several years ago, she said.

Chinatown traffic

Josie Huang/KPCC

Tommy Lo, 18, would like to see more bike lanes in Chinatown. Few people bike because they"are too afraid of cars and the traffic," he said.

Chinatown heat map

APIOPA

The Asian Pacific Islander Obesity Prevention Alliance spotlighted the density of accidents in Chinatown, using collision data from the Berkeley Transportation Injury Mapping System.


As a retiree without a car, Grace Yin walks the streets of Chinatown every day, and never lets her guard down. Everywhere, she said, there are careless drivers. A relative was hit crossing Broadway and Cesar Chavez Avenue several years ago.

"You have to look to the east, look to the west," Yin said in Mandarin. "You have to be very careful."

Los Angeles isn’t known as the friendliest place for pedestrians and bicyclists. But a new analysis by the Asian & Pacific Islander Obesity Prevention Alliance shows that they face an elevated risk of injury from reckless driving in Chinatown. (The APIOPA used the UC Berkeley's Traffic Injury Mapping Systems, which relies on data from the California Highway Patrol).

Drivers were at fault in 76 percent of collisions with pedestrians in Chinatown, compared to 66 percent for Los Angeles County, according to the alliance's analysis. This worries the alliance’s Jeffrey Kho, given that elderly residents make up about a quarter of Chinatown's population.
 
"If you’re a young person, you see a car coming at you, you can run, you can jump," Kho said. "If you’re an elderly person with a walker, or even limping across, it’s a lot harder to get out of the way."

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In immigration news: Feds stop search for extra child shelter space, CA officials propose legal help for migrant kids, state immigration laws, more

U.S. Agents Take Undocumented Immigrants Into Custody Near Tex-Mex Border

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Salvadoran immigrant Stefany Marjorie, 8, holds her doll Rodrigo on July 24, 2014 in Mission, Texas. The White House has reportedly abandoned its search for additional shelter space for unaccompanied migrant minors, after the number of children and teens arriving at the U.S.-Mexico border has declined.

U.S. drops search for new shelters to house child immigrants - McClatchy The White House has reportedly abandoned its search for additional shelter space for unaccompanied migrant minors, after the number of children and teens arriving at the U.S.-Mexico border has declined. Three emergency shelters set up at military bases have shut down, including one in Ventura County, Calif. that opened in June.

Gov. Brown announces legislation to provide migrants kids with legal help - Southern California Public Radio Legislation announced Thursday by California Gov. Jerry Brown and other state officials proposes providing $3 million to qualifying non-profits to provide legal help for unaccompanied child minors, the majority of whom land in the immigration court system without legal representation.

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